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South Korean women protest in Seoul over hidden sex cameras

Tens of thousands of women gathered in Seoul on Saturday calling for a crackdown on spy cam pornography, in one of the country’s biggest ever female-only protests.

Perpetrators film or photograph women with hidden cameras in public spaces.

Although distributing pornography is illegal in South Korea, the videos and pictures are shared widely online.

Organisers say women live in constant fear of being photographed or filmed without their knowledge.

Carrying placards and banners with messages like “My life is not your porn”, the women were mostly teenagers or in their 20s – seen as the main victims of the hidden cameras.

“Those men who film such videos! Those who upload them! Those who watch them! All of them should be punished sternly!” they chanted.

The women covered their faces with masks, hats and sunglasses as instructed by the organisers.

Demonstrators said around 55,000 women took part, although police put the figure at around 20,000.

The recent protests began after police arrested a 25-year-old woman in May for secretly photographing a male colleague who posed nude for university art students. She then shared the picture online.

Demonstrators believe police only acted so swiftly because it was a female perpetrator, and pointed to instances of police closing cases with female victims because they could not find the photographers or track them online, because they posted on foreign servers.

While the law mandates a maximum five-year prison term or 10 million won ($8,970; £6,770) fine for creating sexual images, and a maximum seven year sentence and 30 million won ($26,900; £20,200) fine for distributing them for profit, protesters say many receive far lighter punishments.

The recent protests began after police arrested a 25-year-old woman in May for secretly photographing a male colleague who posed nude for university art students. She then shared the picture online.

Demonstrators believe police only acted so swiftly because it was a female perpetrator, and pointed to instances of police closing cases with female victims because they could not find the photographers or track them online, because they posted on foreign servers.

While the law mandates a maximum five-year prison term or 10 million won ($8,970; £6,770) fine for creating sexual images, and a maximum seven year sentence and 30 million won ($26,900; £20,200) fine for distributing them for profit, protesters say many receive far lighter punishments.

By BBC

South Korean women are mobilizing in unprecedented ways

On June 9, the area around Hyehwa Station in Seoul was filled with women in red attire once again. More than 22,000 women took to the streets carrying placards inscribed with slogans such as “My daily life is not your porn.” The turnout greatly exceeded the over 12,000 who attended the first demonstration on May 19. There was also a hair-shaving ceremony for women who had volunteered in advance. But instead of the grim resolve that often accompanies hair-shaving ceremonies, it was a scene of cheering and applause.

In recent weeks, South Korean society has been facing a new kind of resistance from young women. The two demonstrations at Hyehwa Station – which were organized by a Daum internet café called “Uncomfortable Courage” – have mobilized an increasing number of young women who have never demonstrated before. While the investigation into the unauthorized posting of photos of a nude male model at Hongik University cannot itself be described as biased, that investigation was sufficient to ignite the latent rage and fear about society’s failure to do something about the spy cams that have harmed countless women and about the male chauvinism that has condoned that failure

On June 10, the day after the demonstration at Hyehwa Station, a group called Bwave held a demonstration calling for the complete legalization of abortion, the group’s 14th such demonstration. And on June 2, a demonstration held by Fire Femi Action protesting Facebook’s deletion of a topless photo of women became the center of attention and controversy. 

 

Some critics have responded to these women’s repeated “action” by arguing that feminism foments the “war between the sexes” and “misandry,” but this only takes us further away from tackling this problem. Some partial problems that are seen in these demonstrations – tendencies toward anonymity, exclusivity and aggression – cannot be the grounds for rejecting the legitimacy of their demands. At the moment, women are not angry at individual men, but at a society in which they are not even guaranteed basic rights such as the right to life and safety and the right to make decisions about their own bodies. 

 

Many experts contend that these demonstrations are not some passing fad but will continue and persist until concrete measures are taken and tangible change is seen. While the sexism that has calcified over the long years is unlikely to be reversed all at once, change begins by listening carefully, and without prejudice, to the voice of women.

Source: HANKYOREH

Stalker-assisting spy devices: Bugs & hacking software sold online for £20

USB charging cable with hidden eavesdropping GSM device (SIM card slot) ©Shapestones.  

Technology has advanced so quickly that stalkers are now able to carry out digital surveillance on their targets – bugging their phones and accessing their locations with ease, victims’ groups warn.
Everyday more and more people are engaging in stalking, using listening devices that cost as little as £20 ($28) some of which can easily be hidden inside plug adaptors.

Companies like Amazon and eBay are selling spy tools over the internet, with victims’ helplines announcing an increasing number of complaints as a result.

“[The devices] are really easy to get, they’re really easy to use,” said Clare Elcombe Webber, manager of the National Stalking Helpline, the Guardian reported. “I think for some stalkers it really legitimizes what they’re doing… The message it sends to victims is there are all these technological advancements that help your stalker, but not you.”

Cases include a woman who had a USB-like listening gadget placed in her handbag by her stalker. There are more and more cases of small digital devices being used to spy on people

“We see this regularly… they put in listening devices or video devices in the house or tracking devices on the car and you can buy all of that on Amazon,” Chief Executive of Digital-Trust Jennifer Perry told the Guardian.

Another woman’s ex used a bug inside an extension lead. The former partner was then texting her details of the bedtime stories that she told her children.

Spyware and spying apps were also used in roughly 130 cases dealt with by the national helpline.

Shockingly, the camera of a laptop can be turned on by someone remotely using the software, while keystrokes can be traced to read conversations from the device. The purchase and installation of such devices is now illegal under the Computer Act of 1990.

“We had one client who went home, her laptop was on, she had a shower, she then got a message from her stalker saying ‘Did you have a nice shower?’” said Elcombe Webber.“It’s that kind of invasion and not knowing how that person is able to see you. Are they outside? Are they in the house? It’s really, really frightening.”

In the 11 months to November 2017, the National Stalking Helpline received 4,337 calls or emails. More than half of cases were involving an ex-partner and 77 percent of the victims were female.

After the Guardian alerted eBay to the existence of the USB and plug listening devices, the items were removed from the site.

Source: RT News