Uk

Boiler room raid uncovered hidden documents and spy cameras

Six jailed for £2.8m fraud following the City watchdog’s Operation Tidworth

By Hannah Murphy

They might be called “boiler room scams”, but one of the biggest examples of organized investment fraud in the UK took place inside an office building in east London. Back in March 2014, staff from the UK’s financial watchdog launched a search operation at the Docklands Business Centre. Several floors up, Jeannine Lewis, 50, was caught on CCTV sweeping up a stack of glossy brochures and standing on a table to remove a ceiling tile to store the documents in the roof. Minutes later, she did this again — though this time moving a large black computer system. According to the Financial Conduct Authority, Ms. Lewis was hiding evidence from authorities concerning a sprawling London-based boiler room scam that cost 170 unsuspecting victims a total of £2.8m. The FCA, which has now brought its second-largest criminal prosecution to date against Ms. Lewis and five others for the scam, had made an unannounced visit to the office, catching the defendants off guard. Ms. Lewis claimed at Southwark Crown Court that she had merely been adhering to her company’s clean desk policy. But the group has now been found guilty of charges including fraud, money laundering and perverting the course of justice. In a coup for a regulator keen to shake off accusations of being too “soft”, sentencing on Friday confirmed the defendants would be jailed for a total of nearly 29 years. Dubbed Operation Tidworth by the FCA, the case shines a harsh spotlight on the shady world of boiler rooms— unauthorized brokerages that use cold calling and other high-pressure sales tactics to push worthless or overpriced investments to members of the public. The court heard that the defendants set up five different boiler room operations between July 2010 and April 2014 to persuade people to invest in a company that owned land on the Portuguese island of Madeira. Investors were told the land — and therefore the company’s shares — would increase in value to give returns of as much as 228 percent, thanks to the proposed development of a prestigious golf course nearby. However, investors never saw their money again. Instead, it funded the lavish lifestyle of the group’s ringleader, former bouncer Michael Nascimento. According to prosecutors, the 41-year-old spent £23,000 on VIP Arsenal football club season tickets and £46,000 a year renting a six-bedroom property. Mr. Nascimento was portrayed by prosecutors as paranoid and controlling. Ironically, it was he who installed the CCTV cameras — that captured Ms. Lewis, his personal assistant, stowing away the documents and computer hardware — in order to secretly monitor his staff.

On Friday, he was the last of the group to be sentenced, receiving 11 years. On the same day, he and his chief salesman Charanjit Sandhu, 28, were also sentenced in another case involving the mis-selling of £2.4m of carbon credits to 130 victims. Here, the court heard, the proceeds were used to buy items such as an Aston Martin and a Rolex. At an earlier hearing, the court found the defendants guilty of offenses of conspiracy to defraud, fraud, money laundering and perverting the course of justice, as well as breaches of markets legislation.

Charanjit Sandhu was sentenced to five and a half years’ imprisonment. Hugh Edwards, 36, and Stuart Rea, 50, who both recruited sales brokers, were sentenced to three years and nine months each. Jeannine Lewis, Mr. Nascimento’s personal assistant, received two and a half years while Ryan Parker, 25, described as the “office dogsbody”, was jailed for two years. Operation Tidworth has been presented as a win for the FCA, which has recently sought to flex its muscles as an investigator and prosecutor of financial crime. As part of its prosecution, the watchdog seized more than 100 computers, trawled through 4m documents and analyzed 65 bank accounts — both in the UK and overseas. In terms of the amount of evidence sifted through by investigators, the case comes second only to the sprawling insider dealer case named Operation Tabernula. Indeed, Mr. Nascimento and his associates went to great lengths to deceive their victims. In convincing investment brochures seized by the FCA, one of the boiler room companies boasted of being “one of the UK’s largest wealth advisory firms”. Documents were forged under the name of the Four Seasons and Hilton Hotels to con investors into thinking the hotel chains were interested in buying the Madeira development. Website content was copied from banks such as Commerzbank and Citibank. One investor was even flown with his wife to Madeira to meet Mr. Nascimento and Mr. Sandhu who were using fake names. The couple were shown land that was not the land they were said to be investing in. The investor, who lost about £923,000, told the court that he felt like he had been “a fool” and would have to “live with that for the rest of [his] life”.

Hannah Laming, a partner at law firm Peters & Peters with a focus on business crime, said: “There’s been a lot of focus on insider dealings and the headline fines that you get from banks. But I think it’s important for [the FCA] to focus on cases like this. The people who’ve lost the money — it’s their life savings.” Still, questions have been raised as to how the same perpetrators were able to continue to operate over a four-year period, reinventing themselves even after the FCA was made aware of the first iteration of a boiler room operation involving Mr. Nascimento in 2011.

Mark Steward, the FCA’s director of enforcement and market oversight, said this was because Mr. Nascimento used numerous tactics to avoid detection. “He deliberately hid his identity, used other people like the directors and signatories on the bank accounts, [and] avoided having his name on any documentation,” he said. Others urge more transparency around what happens when the public, or businesses, report these types of scams and fraud. One expert in the sector, who did not wish to be named, said that it was unclear how the FCA handled complaints. “It would be good to know what they do with these sorts of reports from the public and how they pursue them,” the expert said. Regulators will be hoping that the publicity surrounding the case will open the eyes and ears of more unsuspecting investors, and give them the confidence to hang up on any cold callers who are offering a seemingly hot deal.

 

£10bn a year netted in increasingly sophisticated frauds

Boiler rooms operations, immortalized in films such as Leonardo DiCaprio’s The Wolf of Wall Street, have long been a bugbear for police and regulators. Often, vulnerable and elderly people are targeted. “Fraudsters will prey on an individual’s anxiety about the future,” said Mark Steward, the FCA’s director of enforcement and market oversight, citing as examples concerns about building an adequate pension or paying for a child’s education. But more experienced investors can also fall victim: the biggest individual loss recorded by the police stands at £6m. The scams tend to focus on “flavor of the month” investments, according to Detective Inspector Andy Thompson of City of London Police fraud squad. These have included land, diamonds, art, wine and, lately, cryptocurrencies, he said. Typically, salespeople known as “openers” call people on a list bought from marketing companies dubbed a “suckers list”. But it is so-called “closers” — those who set up the scam and tend to be the ones closing the deals — who are often the beneficiaries. During a recent raid on a boiler room scam, the police found framed photographs of Ferraris on the desks of closers, Det Insp Thompson said. This type of fraud is becoming increasingly sophisticated. Keith Brown, a professor of social work at Bournemouth University who is also involved in research into scams for the Chartered Trading Standards Institute, warned that most people were unaware of the scale of financial fraud in the UK, which he estimated at about £10bn worth a year. “A lot of the new data protections and [some] new cold-calling regulations are very important and very helpful,” he said, referencing rules that came into force this month, banning unsolicited nuisance calls. “[But] there’s a lot of money to be made and criminals have a lot of resources to develop new tactics.” Det Insp Thompson said many boiler rooms “sail close to legality”, often seeking out legitimate legal advice. Others move money offshore and create unnecessary layers of bureaucracy to frustrate the authorities. “It’s Darwinian,” he said. “You always catch the ones who are less sophisticated, but then they learn from that.”

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2018. All rights reserved.

STALKER HELL Ex-boyfriend spied on lover by hiding secret cameras and listening devices in her home

Wayne Bamford, 47, was told he faces a ‘significant custodial sentence’ because of the risks he faces to women

By Robin Perrie

JEALOUS Wayne Bamford is facing jail after he placed covert listening devices in his ex-partner’s bedroom during a stalking campaign.

Bamford, 47, refused to accept their relationship was over after Joanna Dawson ended it and launched a “highly sophisticated” covert operation to keep tabs on her.

He was able to phone in to the devices which then provided a live feed so he could hear what was going on in her bedroom.

Over a period of 15 days he connected to the devices 1,600 times, a court heard.

But the surveillance op was foiled when mum-of-one Joanne sought advice from a spy shop after suspecting he might have bugged her home.

He was told he faces a “significant custodial sentence” because of the risks he faces to women.

His case was heard on the same day that Corrie Star Kym Marsh backed our Stop a Stalker campaign.

Kym, who has twice been targeted, urged readers to sign our petition backing an MP’s bid to increase police power to combat stalkers.

Bamford and Joanne began a relationship in May 2016 and started an accident management business together six months later.

But their relationship quickly turned sour and ended in January 2017.

Prosecutor Anthony Moore told Bradford crown court that Joanne’s suspicions were raised when Bamford appeared to comment on her movements.

She became even more concerned when she contacted a locksmith to boost security and Bamford texted her saying: “There is no need to change your locks”.

She visited a spy shop for advice and was told her what to look for. She returned home and found a listening device in her bedroom.

Joanne told the court: “He played me a recording in my own house and told me he had paid someone to place a device on the outside of my house which I did not believe.

“I went to a spy shop in Leeds and asked them, ‘if I wanted to bug someone’s house what do you do?’ “He told me what to look for.” She later found a second device hidden behind a TV in her bedroom and Bamford, of Gildersome, near Leeds, was arrested.

Bamford admitted stalking causing serious alarm or distress but a trial of issue was held yesterday after the prosecution and defence could not agree on the basis of his guilty plea.

He claimed to have fitted only one of the listening devices and said she had fitted the other to keep tabs on another ex.

But the judge, Recorder Anthony Hawks, said: “I find the complainant entirely plausible.

“I find the defendant evasive and dishonest. I totally reject his account that the complainant was responsible.

“I’m very concerned about the risk you may present to people. You were prepared to engage in a highly sophisticated way to stalk that woman.

Navy veteran raped schoolgirl and planted hidden camera

Scott Forbes plied a 14-year-old girl with alcohol during sex attacks in Edinburgh.

A former serviceman raped a schoolgirl and sexually assaulted another underage girl 

By STV

Scott Forbes also placed a hidden camera in another victim’s bedroom and recorded footage of her while she was naked and getting dressed.

Jailing him for nine years on Monday, a judge told Forbes, 49, that the corrosive effect of his behavior on victims was “incalculable”.

 Lord Woolman said: “You have altered the course of their lives.”

Forbes, formerly of Firrhill Park, in Edinburgh, was convicted of five offences committed between 2009 and May last year, including rape, sexual assault and possessing and making indecent images of children.

He locked a 14-year-old in a house in Edinburgh and made sexual remarks to the child and molested and raped her and photographed her naked body.

He also plied another 14-year-old with drink, showed her pornography, molested her and took pictures of her naked body while she was intoxicated at an address in Edinburgh on May last year.

Forbes was also found to have set up equipment at a house in Bonnyrigg, in Midlothian, to covertly shoot and record footage of a third victim in April last year.

Lord Woolman also ordered at the High Court in Edinburgh that the Royal Navy veteran should be kept under supervision for an extra four years after his release.

The judge said he had “narrowly” decided against calling for a full risk-assessment report, which can lead to the making of an Order for Lifelong Restriction.

He told Forbes he was prepared to treat him as a first offender and noted that he had medical problems which have prevented him working for the last eight years.

Defence counsel David Nicholson said Forbes continued to deny the serious sexual offending.

Mr Nicholson said Forbes had been on long term sick leave following a variety of health problems.

He told the court that Forbes has a neurological condition and was previously diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder.

The defence counsel said that arose primarily from Forbes’ service when he was stationed in Iraq and the Arabian gulf.

He added: “He is not somebody with any difficulty with drugs or alcohol.”

Following the sentencing, police praised victims who came forward to give evidence against Forbes.

Detective Sergeant Jonny Wright, of Edinburgh’s Public Protection Unit, said: “Scott Forbes is a devious individual who took advantage of each of the victims’ trust.

“I want to commend their bravery in coming forward, which has led to Forbes’ conviction.

“I would also like to reassure any victims of sexual crime that there is no time limit to reporting offences and we will always investigate.”

Police Scotland added: “Anyone with information about sexual offences can contact Police Scotland on 101, or report this anonymously to the independent charity Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.”

Pervert landlord watched tenants having sex and made 180 videos of naked women after installing hidden cameras

Paul Dunster, 59, from Portsmouth in Hampshire, would also watch his tenants showering and made films of his unsuspecting victims over a 10 year period

By Danya Bazaraa

A pervert landlord watched his tenants having sex and showering after planting hidden cameras in their rooms, a court heard.

Paul Dunster, 59, made a staggering 183 videos of unsuspecting naked women who rented rooms from him over a 10 year period to ‘satisfy his sexual needs’.

A judge told him it was a “sad” and “disgusting” story.

Police raided former security worker Dunster’s home in Portsmouth, Hampshire, and found two memory cards containing the voyeuristic videos.

He initially denied two charges of voyeurism but later admitted making the secret videos after setting up cameras in the bedroom and bathroom of one of the properties he rented out.

Prosecutor David Reid told Portsmouth Crown Court: “The first memory card had 18 videos which showed sexual encounters between men and women in the bedroom.

“Those videos lasted a total of 20 minutes but none of the tenants were aware of the camera.

“The second memory card was taken from the bathroom and showed women having baths and showers – women who were also totally unaware they were filmed.

“There was significant planning to this and it was an abuse of trust as the women were tenants.”

The court heard army veteran Dunster was landlord of seven flats and had total outstanding mortgages of £870,000.

Daniel Reilly, mitigating, told the hearing: “Many residents are extremely grateful he lets them rent rooms the way he does.”

Sentencing Dunster, Judge David Melville QC said: “The residents would have been disgusted to know you had a camera set up in the bedroom to film people having sex.

“I’m sure people would also have been disgusted to know you set up a camera in the bathroom to satisfy your sexual needs.

“It is sad story and one which is disgusting.”

Dunster was ordered to pay a £5,000 fine plus £500 in costs, and was given 100 hours of unpaid work with 20 rehabilitation days.
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‘Sly’ Osteopath filmed sex with patient using hidden camera at Liverpool practice

Michael George Hammond avoided jail today – but not before his behaviour was branded ‘disgraceful’

By Tom Molloy & Liam Thorp

A ‘deceitful and sly’ Osteopath who filmed a sexual act with one of his patients using a hidden camera has avoided jail.

Michael George Hammond recorded the act using a camera hidden inside a pen on a shelf at his Liverpool practice to record the act.

The 61-year-old, of Llangoed in North Wales, pleaded guilty to voyeurism after an ex-partner and former patient of his found the recording while she was waiting to be seen by him at his Aigburth practice, The Daily Post reports.

At Caernarfon Crown Court, Judge Huw Rees described the act as “a deceitful and sly offence on a lady entitled to privacy and respect”.

He added that although the sexual act was consensual, the extent he went to in order to film it, without the victim’s knowledge, was one that required “considerable purpose of mind”.

Judge Rees said: “You sought out this pen, you purchased it, you secreted it in your treatment room and positioned it surreptitiously.

“You trespassed on her dignity and slyly invaded her privacy.”

Karl Scholz, prosecuting, called for a custodial sentence as he believed the offence fell within the category one sentencing guidelines for sexual assault, due to raised harm and raised culpability.

Paulinus Barnes, defending, said Hammond was remorseful and knew his career was probably over.

He said: “He knew from the outset that his behaviour was disgraceful.

“He abused the lady’s privacy and he is genuinely remorseful.

“He’s now had to close his business, his career is over, and he’s lost his good name. That’s quite some punishment in itself.”

He said aggravating factors including the place of the offence being Hammond’s clinic, the images being available to be viewed and the fact that Hammond appeared to use his position as a platform to abuse women.

Mr. Scholz also said the crime “involved planning and involved a breach of trust”.

Mr Barnes asked for any prison sentence to be suspended, reminded the judge of Hammond’s early guilty plea and pointing out that the recording wasn’t uploaded to the internet or distributed further.

Sentencing Hammond to six months imprisonment, suspended for 18 months, Judge Rees described the offence as “entirely degrading” for the victim and told Hammond: “This is a substantial fall from grace for you, at the age of 61.”

Judge Rees also ordered Hammond to complete 150 hours of unpaid work, complete a 50-day rehabilitation rehabilitation activity requirement and pay victim surcharges within three months.

He also called for the recording to be destroyed.

Judge Rees added: “Any failures of these conditions, exceptional circumstances aside, you will be jailed”.

Creepy cab driver used hidden camera to secretly film under clothes of passengers

Cops only discovered the covert device after raiding David Whitehead’s home in connection with vile child sex abuse images.

By David Meikle

A taxi driver who installed a hidden camera to film under the clothing of unsuspecting passengers has been jailed for 22 months.

David Whitehead, 53, set up the covert device in a twisted bid to record members of the public as they traveled in his vehicle.

His seedy spying operation saw him capture footage of a passenger but it only came to light when police raided his home in connection with extreme child pornography.

Officers launched a dawn raid at the property in Cumbernauld, after a tip-off and discovered sickening clips and images.

The disturbing haul of 2503 photos and 1529 videos included extreme footage of abuse.

Whitehead appeared at Airdrie Sheriff Court and admitted taking or permitting indecent images of children between August 2005 and August 2017.

He also admitted having the hidden camera in his car between August and September 2013.

He was jailed for 22 months by Sheriff Derek O’Carroll who also placed him on the sex offenders’ register for 10 years.

The court was told Whitehead was stripped of his taxi license soon after his arrest last year.

Ross Brown, defending, said: “It is always very sad to have to represent a client who at a mature age comes before the court for the first time. In pleading guilty, I would reiterate that he takes full responsibility for his misdemeanors.

“I have spoken to him about the charge involving the taxi and he says there had been a number of attacks on colleagues and that was the primary reason for the installation of the camera but when it comes to the positioning of it, there was a secondary purpose for that.

“This was not an easy matter for him to come to terms with and have to disclose to his immediate and wider family. While not condoning it, they are supporting him in his recovery.

“He was formerly a good man but his fall from grace has been a significant one having to admit to these offenses.”

Depute fiscal Agnes Meek earlier told the court police raided Whitehead’s home after receiving information a device at his address had indecent images of children available for sharing.

She added: “A systematic search was carried out and a number of devices were seized. The accused, while standing in his kitchen in front of officers, stated, ‘It is all me, nothing to do with my boy’.”

Sentencing Whitehead, Sheriff O’Carroll said: “The placing of the camera with the view to take images of those using your taxi and also the fact that you were in a position of trust which you abused by placing it to take indecent images means there is no alternative to a custodial sentence.”

Man stalked ex-partner using car tracking device and hidden camera

James Austin Yarwood was upset when his six year relationship hit a ‘rough patch’, court told.

A man who monitored his ex-partner’s movements using trackers and hidden cameras has pleaded guilty to stalking.

By Derek Bellis

James Austin Yarwood placed a tracker in her car’s glove compartment and a hidden camera beneath her TV so he could see her sitting on the sofa chatting to a visitor – even though he was at his father’s home in Leicester.

Llandudno magistrates court chairwoman Janet Ellis told the 30-year-old: “We are quite shocked at some of the things we have heard.”

The court heard the 30-year-old monitored the movements of his ex-partner with the aid of electronic devices because he was upset by a “rough patch” in their six-year relationship.

Gareth Parry, prosecuting, said Yarwood had also bombarded the victim with phone calls and texts.

Yarwood, of Lower Denbigh Road, St Asaph, pleaded guilty to stalking teacher Keilah Stewart at her home at Abergele between May and mid-June and was given a year’s community order.

He must pay his victim £200 compensation and costs of £170, with 100 hours of unpaid work and he must undertake a “building better relationships” programme with the probation service.

But she didn’t want a restraining order so he could maintain contact with two children.

Craig Hutchinson, defending, said Yarwood had a good job with a motor company.

“These were the actions of a desperate man trying to keep his relationship together”, he said.

He added: “There may be a time when the relationship will rekindle. The hope is that everyone will put this behind them.”

Camouflaged camera used to spy on neighbours

A man who used a hidden camera to secretly film his neighbours has been convicted of harassment.

by Ryan Nugent

Thomas Kelly (66), of 14 Weirview, Lucan, Dublin, covered a camera in camouflage netting and pointed it to the rear of a neighbour’s house.

Mr Kelly claimed in court he was using the camera for security, to monitor property boundaries, and to catch one of his neighbours “masturbating repeatedly” in the man’s back garden.

Gardaí were alerted to the situation after the neighbour, Paul Lynam, discovered two cameras on a cliff at the back of his home in early 2016.

In his evidence at Blanchardstown District Court, Mr Lynam, of 7 Weirview, said: “I’d a feeling for a long time that I was being watched.”

On foot of the discovery, Mr Lynam, along with two other neighbours, journalist John Mooney and Willie Stapleton – whose homes were also captured by the camera, made an official complaint to gardaí on February 11, 2016.

The following day, gardaí arrived with a search warrant for Kelly’s home along with two other properties he owned, 11 and 12 Wearview.

Upon entering 14 Weirview, now-retired Detective Inspector Richard McDonald said in his evidence there were two large flat screen televisions located in the sitting room. One of the TVs was showing regular programmes, with the other having live feeds to all 16 of Kelly’s CCTV cameras.

Gda Damien Reilly also discovered the camera located on top of the cliff to the rear of the house.

The camera, along with the hard drive of the CCTV system and a number of USB sticks on which footage was stored, was seized by gardaí.

Det Insp McDonald said video footage showed zooming in on the rear of certain homes.

 
A further search by gardaí on July 15, 2016, discovered a replacement camera where the initial one was seized. On this occasion more USB sticks were seized.

On reviewing what had been seized initially, gardaí called Mr Lynam in on May 21, 2016, to review the footage.

One clip appeared to show Mr Lynam to the rear of his own home masturbating. When asked by gardaí if that was the case, Mr Lynam said it was.

In his defence, Kelly claimed in court that he had witnessed Mr Lynam masturbating at the back of 7 Wearview while he was working at the top of the cliff.

He said he had made a complaint to child and family agency Tusla and used the camera to catch Mr Lynam in the act.

Kelly said Mr Lynam was “habitually” naked and was “masturbating repeatedly”.

“My purpose in using those cameras was to capture him doing what we all knew he was doing so I could advance my case,” Kelly said.

He said his grandchildren would be up on top of the cliff and he didn’t want them to witness it.

Kelly also claimed that the 16 cameras were primarily used as a security mechanism and to monitor the boundaries of his land – currently the subject of an ongoing civil dispute.

In their evidence, the victims said they had been “stalked”.

Mr Mooney said: “I have a teenage daughter and a son with a camera pointed at their bedrooms. It terrifies me to think that’s going on.”

He added that he could not allow his daughter to open the blinds at the back of the house for two years, for fears they were being watched.

He said he was alerted to the cameras after Mr Lynam showed images of them to him.

Defence barrister Kitty Perle described the dispute between the neighbours over land as “hotly contested and entrenched warfare”.

Judge David McHugh found the defendant guilty on four counts of harassment. Kelly was remanded on bail until September 27, when victim impact statements will be read out.

 
Irish Independent

Spy camera fury: Staff walk out after discovering hidden lenses in Glasgow shop

STAFF at a city center health food store have gone on strike after discovering secret cameras in rooms where staff changed, just four weeks after opening.

Exclusive by Niall Christie

Workers at Harvest Stores, some under 18, were horrified and alerted police after findings the lenses hidden in a network modem and air detector.

The Union Street store, which has been closed since Monday’s walk out, houses nearly 70 cameras but, as the room is not a designated changing area, legal lines have not been crossed by managing director Amin Din.

The row emerged amid claims that Mr Din owes four staff thousands in unpaid wages.

Store manager Karen Nicholson, who led the walk out, said: “We shut the shop as soon as we found the cameras and got the police in.

“That is where staff got changed and nobody knew about these until Monday. We uncovered the cameras in the office on Sunday, where staff also get dressed, and then checked the staff room as we knew the number of cameras and microphones in the shop already.

“We might have suspected this but it was still a massive shock. He monitors the cameras from home.

“Police said that while it was morally questionable, legally he was in the clear.

“I am very upset. The staff are predominantly young women, some of them are just young girls under 18. Now they are worried about what has happened to the footage.”

She added that officers were “amazed” at the number of cameras in the shop.

Staff have also been left in the lurch as some are owed hundreds in unpaid wages from June. In total, four staff are yet to get just under £2,000 from the shop’s owner.

They now face an anxious wait to see whether they will be paid this week.

Despite being paid in full, supervisor Robert Taylor also walked out.

With three young children to support, he may have to sell belongings to afford food.

He said: “I’m putting together a list of things that I can afford to sell to pay rent.

“We’re doing this so new staff don’t have to deal with the secrets and lies like us.

“I will be looking for other work but I’m worried I won’t get my next pay this week.”

After walking out, staff approached the Baker’s Union and Better than Zero who are now supporting them through an industrial action.

A spokesperson for Better than Zero said: “It takes real courage to do what the workers at Harvest Stores are doing – standing together as union members, against a boss who has run his business with a toxic mix of control and intimidation.”

“Karen, Robert and their co-workers will go all the way to get the pay they’re due. But this is about more than settling a wage dispute – by speaking out and joining the BFAWU union en masse, they are lighting a beacon for everyone in Glasgow whose pay and conditions are set at the mercy of the boss.

 
“Precarious work is becoming the norm in Glasgow, and Better than Zero is ready to support all workers who are prepared to join unions and take on those who profit from low pay and insecurity.”

Police also confirmed that they had attended the store on Monday morning over a problem with security cameras.

They added: “Police provided assistance and advice was given to staff on the matter. No crime was identified.”

When asked to comment, Mr Din said that the matter was a “stupid oversight” on his part.

He said: “I hold my hands up and admit that I should have put signs up sooner.

“Basically the staff entered and found cameras in the staff kitchen area and office.

“It was not a changing area. The police confirmed that no law has been broken. They were installed by a reputable company. I can monitor these from home but they have not been working.

“They were purely for security purposes so that if there were any issues I could look back. I just never got around to putting them up. There is a separate area for changing for staff in the toilet facility, with a separate sink. This was made clear. There are cleaning products everywhere.

“The pay issue was resolved by the accountant and staff would have been paid in full on Monday. As the company is new, it hadn’t worked out.

“Staff were not paid in full or on time. Every single staff member was asked before hand. We were late getting details to the accountant so there was a delay.

“It was an oversight and they were there for security only.”

CABBIE CAM Lanarkshire taxi driver installed hidden camera in his cab to upskirt female passengers

Police discovered his pervy cam after they raided his home in connection with sick images of children

By David Meikle

A TAXI driver who installed a hidden camera to film under the clothing of unsuspecting passengers is facing jail.

David Whitehead, 53, set up the covert device in a twisted bid to record members of the public as they travelled in his vehicle.

His seedy spying operation saw him capture footage of a passenger but it only came to light when police raided his home in connection with sick images of children.

Officers launched a dawn raid at the property in Cumbernauld, Lanarkshire, after a tip off and discovered extreme clips and pictures.

The disturbing haul of 2503 photos and 1529 videos included horrific footage of abuse.

Whitehead appeared at Airdrie Sheriff Court and admitted taking or permitting indecent images of children between August 2005 and August 2017

He also admitted having the hidden camera in his car between August and September 2013.

The court was told Whitehead was stripped of his taxi licence soon after his arrest last year.

 

Depute fiscal Agnes Meek said: “Information was received by the National Child Abuse Prevention that a device associated with the locus was connected to the internet and had indecent images of children available for sharing.

“Officers sought and were granted a warrant and police attended to execute the warrant.

“A systematic search was carried out and a number of devices were seized.

“The accused while standing in his kitchen in front of officers, stated ‘it is all me, nothing to do with my boy’.

“He was detained and after provided a no comment interview.”

Miss Meek added: “One moving image is 29 minutes long and features several clips put together of child sexual exploitation.”

Sheriff Derek O’Carroll deferred sentence and continued Whitehead’s bail for reports but warned him to expect to be sent to prison.

He added: “Given the nature of the offences you should understand that a custodial sentence is very much at the forefront of this court’s mind.

“I will continue your bail but you should not draw any conclusions from that regarding the ultimate final disposal of this case.”

Whitehead was placed on the sex offenders register.

North Lanarkshire Council confirmed they revoked Whitehead’s taxi licence last year.

His not guilty pleas to possessing indecent photos, possessing extreme bestiality images and possessing cannabis were accepted by prosecutors.